Logic 101 · Philosophy · Series

Logic 101: The Qualities of Good Arguments

In my last post I summarized twelve principles from Attacking Faulty Reasoning that constitute what T. Edward Damer calls “A Code of Intellectual Conduct.” (From here on in the post I will refer to this as simply the “Code.”) These principles are not only useful in the ways that I described in the last post (as… Continue reading Logic 101: The Qualities of Good Arguments

Logic 101 · Philosophy · Series

Logic 101: A Code of Intellectual Conduct

In the previous post in this series on logic I discussed the R.E.A.D. Method. This is the procedure for finding and evaluating arguments that I will continue to fill out during this series. But before I jump into an exploration of topics under each acronym of the R.E.A.D. Method, I think it’s important to lay… Continue reading Logic 101: A Code of Intellectual Conduct

Logic 101 · Philosophy · Series

Logic 101: Two Basic Types of Arguments

In my last post I discussed what arguments are and are not. Arguments are supported opinions, meaning some claims (premises) are used to support another claim or opinion (the conclusion). But knowing what arguments are isn’t enough to be able to recognize them. We also have to be able to recognize what kind of argument is… Continue reading Logic 101: Two Basic Types of Arguments

Logic 101 · Philosophy · Series

Logic 101: What’s an Argument?

This entire series is going to be focused on finding and evaluating arguments. But nothing that I said in the Series Introduction indicated exactly what I mean by an “argument” in the first place. I’ll explain that in this post. What Arguments Are Not Let’s start by clearing away some misconceptions about what arguments are.… Continue reading Logic 101: What’s an Argument?

Introduction · Logic 101 · Philosophy · Series

Series Introduction: Logic 101

Let’s start this series with a scenario that you may, or may not, ever find yourself in. You are walking through your favorite antique store when you accidentally bump into a fragile item on a shelf. The next two seconds seem like slow motion as you watch the item fall to the floor and shatter.… Continue reading Series Introduction: Logic 101